Growing HOPE

A Grim Picture

The amount of international aid pouring into South Sudan is almost beyond belief and, in the face of more than 2.4 million people (of a total population of 11.5 million) having to flee their homes, the challenge only increases on a daily basis.

South Sudan should be a country full of hope, four years after gaining independence. Instead, it’s now in the grip of a massive, man-made humanitarian crisis.
For a nation whose starving population has for years depended upon emergency food relief from international humanitarian agencies, the long-term prospects are very dismal.

Years of war with both external and internal combatants has left much of South Sudan in desperate condition... economically, physically, emotionally, governmentally — in virtually every way imaginable.

The nation's infrastructure — roadways, power supplies, health systems, and a host of other essential services — is a virtual shambles.

The leadership of this, the world's newest nation, is almost overwhelmed by the demands of simply maintaining existence on the world scene.  Moving forward is a slow and agonizing process.

​Some would say it's almost impossible.
Ongoing violence continues to keep people from their homes, damage markets and disrupt planting, all of which keeps families from getting the food they need to survive.

"I am afraid we have lost our future and everything we worked so hard for to win our independence," says one of the displaced women. "We worked hard to build a life here and have beds to sleep on, blankets and plates to eat off. Now it is all gone.” 


Across the country, children can't learn, people can’t work, farmers can’t plant — all they can do is hope to survive until there is an end to the vicious fighting.

Emergency feeding has been the norm for many, many decades.

And it is still essential. But if food security is to be established for the future, farming must be intensified. Those on the verge of starvation vary from one to three million every year.

International subsidies for emergency feeding is dwindling.
  1. Jackson
    Jackson
    Description
  2. Rose
    Rose
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  3. John
    John
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  4. Emelda
    Emelda
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  5. Charles
    Charles
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  6. Michael
    Michael
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What
HOPE
Looks Like


The light of hope is  reflected in these photos of some of the beneficiaries of the various programs that are part of Harvest Sudan.

CLICK ON A PICTURE
TO READ THEIR STORY



Click HERE to see details about the Out-Growers Program in which these people participate.